Day of the Girl US

Calling all young activists: It is time to make a change to achieve TRUE gender equality. 
Day of the Girl-US is a 100% youth-led movement not affiliated with any organization. We want ourselves, and girls everywhere, to be seen as equals, in the eyes of others and in our own eyes. The Day of the Girl movement is a growing response to an urgent problem facing our world today: the neglect and devaluation of girls around the world. Since the United Nations declared October 11 as the International Day of the Girl Child in 2011, dynamic groups across the world (led by girls, of course!) act to highlight, discuss, celebrate and ultimately advance girls’ lives and opportunities across the globe. When girls come together to talk about what really matters to us, we can teach ourselves and other people–adults, boys, and other girls all across the world–new ways of thinking about gender issues, which will empower us take action to change the status quo.
See what we’re all about: www.dayofthegirl.org
Our goal, as Day of the Girl-US,  is for girls to organize Rallies in 11 cities on Saturday, October 11, 2014.Our 2014 Rally Project is an effort to raise young female voices, create a new generation of activists and promote action for gender equality. We aim for these rallies to be led by youth who will bring together local organizations in order to create action. We envision the rallies to be a foundation for local organizations concerned with girls’ issues, such as girl’s education, media portrayal, Title IX, sex trafficking, street harassment, and other Day-related topics, to share their message. We see rallies as an interactive experience that will include dance, music, and poetry elements in addition to speakers. Most importantly, we hope for rallies to inspire participants to take action by working in their community, with their government, and with other nonprofits to advance girls’ lives and opportunities.
In order to achieve this goal, we need YOUR help! Donate to our Indiegogo campaign to help shoulder the cost of the rallies, or apply for a grant to lead one of our rallies! Below is a rally toolkit in which you can get more information on how to host a rally.  Want to apply for a grant to fund your rally?  Fill out our form here!
Please signal boost this— this is a really awesome movement that is 100% youth-led and grassroots!!!  {

Calling all young activists: It is time to make a change to achieve TRUE gender equality. 

Day of the Girl-US is a 100% youth-led movement not affiliated with any organization. We want ourselves, and girls everywhere, to be seen as equals, in the eyes of others and in our own eyes. The Day of the Girl movement is a growing response to an urgent problem facing our world today: the neglect and devaluation of girls around the world. Since the United Nations declared October 11 as the International Day of the Girl Child in 2011, dynamic groups across the world (led by girls, of course!) act to highlight, discuss, celebrate and ultimately advance girls’ lives and opportunities across the globe. When girls come together to talk about what really matters to us, we can teach ourselves and other people–adults, boys, and other girls all across the world–new ways of thinking about gender issues, which will empower us take action to change the status quo.

See what we’re all about: www.dayofthegirl.org

Our goal, as Day of the Girl-US,  is for girls to organize Rallies in 11 cities on Saturday, October 11, 2014.Our 2014 Rally Project is an effort to raise young female voices, create a new generation of activists and promote action for gender equality. We aim for these rallies to be led by youth who will bring together local organizations in order to create action. We envision the rallies to be a foundation for local organizations concerned with girls’ issues, such as girl’s education, media portrayal, Title IX, sex trafficking, street harassment, and other Day-related topics, to share their message. We see rallies as an interactive experience that will include dance, music, and poetry elements in addition to speakers. Most importantly, we hope for rallies to inspire participants to take action by working in their community, with their government, and with other nonprofits to advance girls’ lives and opportunities.

In order to achieve this goal, we need YOUR help! Donate to our Indiegogo campaign to help shoulder the cost of the rallies, or apply for a grant to lead one of our rallies! Below is a rally toolkit in which you can get more information on how to host a rally.  Want to apply for a grant to fund your rally?  Fill out our form here!

Please signal boost this— this is a really awesome movement that is 100% youth-led and grassroots!!! 

angrypeopleofcolorunited:

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY!!!

halftheskymovement:

Artist Nickolay Lamm has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise $95,000 to begin production on a doll that has a real woman’s proportions. The line is called Lammily and it goes by the tagline “Average is beautiful.” 

Find out more via TIME

Yesterday was International Women’s Day. What did YOU do to celebrate? {

Yesterday was International Women’s Day. What did YOU do to celebrate?

halftheskymovement:

Each year hundreds of thousands of young Indonesian women leave their homes to work as domestic helpers in cities across Asia and the Middle East. They are recruited by domestic-helper brokers who come to their village promising them a better life. Last month, 23-year-old maid Erwiana Sulistyaningsih returned home to Indonesia with cuts and burns on her body and hardly able to walk. Her employer in Hong Kong allegedly beat her and locked her up for weeks. Erwina’s story is just one of many; although Hong Kong has better legal protections than Singapore and Malaysia, its laws still discriminate against foreign domestic workers and can foster abuse.
Read more via The New York Times. {

halftheskymovement:

Each year hundreds of thousands of young Indonesian women leave their homes to work as domestic helpers in cities across Asia and the Middle East. They are recruited by domestic-helper brokers who come to their village promising them a better life. Last month, 23-year-old maid Erwiana Sulistyaningsih returned home to Indonesia with cuts and burns on her body and hardly able to walk. Her employer in Hong Kong allegedly beat her and locked her up for weeks. Erwina’s story is just one of many; although Hong Kong has better legal protections than Singapore and Malaysia, its laws still discriminate against foreign domestic workers and can foster abuse.

Read more via The New York Times.

nudiemuse:

cultureisnotacostume:

thenewwomensmovement:

sydneyflapper:

nudiemuse:

ersassmus:

African American flappers and Jazz Age women

HOLY SHIT I HAVE NEVER SEEN BLACK FLAPPERS BEFORE!

There were many fabulous African American flappers. No wonder - it was African American musicians who put the Jazz in “The Jazz Age”! The Charleston dance iteself, which so epitomizes the era, made its debut in the all-Black musical “Runnin’ Wild”, and no one danced that flapper number better than Josephine Baker…save possibly for fellow Black artist Florence Mills, who claimed credit for inventing it (she said she debuted it in her “Plantation Revue” in the early 20s, developing it from a dance popular among slaves). The Charleston song was written by Black composer James P Johnson. Without women and girls like those above, the 1920s would never have roared.

I think it’s so easy to forget that we, WOC, were there in history too.

The flapper movement was originally started by WOC, and that was part of the reason why it was so scandalous for white women to be flappers at first—because they were dressing and acting line WOC. But of course you’ll never see that in a high school textbook.

-Allyssa

I will reblog again for commentary.

Also think about it like this. I am 36 years old. THIRTY SIX and beyond Josephine Baker prior to these images I had never seen Jazz Age WOC.

Let that sink in.

36 years old and it wasn’t necessarily for lack of effort. 

(Source: ciptochat)

Women are often discouraged from working in areas involving science, technology, engineering, and math (or STEM). You can find this gender gap almost anywhere, whether it’s a crazy boy to girl ratio in an advanced high school math class, a surprisingly small number of women engineers, or the fact that only 18 out of Cisco’s “100 CEO Leaders in STEM” in 2013 were women.

The idea that women shouldn’t work in STEM fields comes from a long outdated notion that women simply aren’t capable. Now, obviously that isn’t true. Research by Generation STEM tells us that girls are extremely interested in pursuing STEM careers. Additionally, females not only earn more science and math credits than males, but also have higher overall GPA’s in these areas.

So what’s holding women back?
Even though women’s rights in education have been expanded thanks to laws like Title IX, the belief that women aren’t adequate in STEM fields has lingered. Traditional gender roles place a lot of pressure on women, suggesting that they can’t perform as well as men. The resulting statistics are pretty shocking: 
 


In 2006, 16.6% of network and computer systems administration jobs belonged to women 


According to a 2011 study by the United States Commerce Department, only 1 in 7 engineers is a woman


Women make up about half of the workforce, however less than 25% of them hold STEM related jobs


Federal statistics show that women account for less than 20% of bachelor degrees in computer science, even though women hold about 60% of all bachelor’s degrees 


According to the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 13% of women have jobs that are concentrated in engineering


According to the National Center for Women and Information Technology, in 2009, women earned 18% of all computer and information sciences undergraduate degrees


More than half of women working in technology companies leave their jobs at the “mid level point” 

In 2011, only 19% of the students who took the AP Computer Science test were female

Create Change


The only way to make a change is to BE the change. Don’t be afraid to sign up for classes in STEM areas, even if they are primarily made up of boys! 


Try joining some clubs at school that involve these STEM areas, such as math team, robotics, science bowl, etc. Find other girls who share your interests, and encourage them to participate with you. If you can’t seem to find a club that’s the right fit, try making your own!


Contact the administration at your school and see if they will assist you in encouraging girls to get involved in STEM.


Contact any local organizations supporting girls/women in STEM and see how you can work with them to make a change.

{

Women are often discouraged from working in areas involving science, technology, engineering, and math (or STEM). You can find this gender gap almost anywhere, whether it’s a crazy boy to girl ratio in an advanced high school math class, a surprisingly small number of women engineers, or the fact that only 18 out of Cisco’s “100 CEO Leaders in STEM” in 2013 were women.


The idea that women shouldn’t work in STEM fields comes from a long outdated notion that women simply aren’t capable. Now, obviously that isn’t true. Research by Generation STEM tells us that girls are extremely interested in pursuing STEM careers. Additionally, females not only earn more science and math credits than males, but also have higher overall GPA’s in these areas.


So what’s holding women back?

Even though women’s rights in education have been expanded thanks to laws like Title IX, the belief that women aren’t adequate in STEM fields has lingered. Traditional gender roles place a lot of pressure on women, suggesting that they can’t perform as well as men. The resulting statistics are pretty shocking:

  • In 2006, 16.6% of network and computer systems administration jobs belonged to women

  • According to a 2011 study by the United States Commerce Department, only 1 in 7 engineers is a woman

  • Women make up about half of the workforce, however less than 25% of them hold STEM related jobs

  • Federal statistics show that women account for less than 20% of bachelor degrees in computer science, even though women hold about 60% of all bachelor’s degrees

  • According to the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 13% of women have jobs that are concentrated in engineering

  • According to the National Center for Women and Information Technology, in 2009, women earned 18% of all computer and information sciences undergraduate degrees

  • More than half of women working in technology companies leave their jobs at the “mid level point”

  • In 2011, only 19% of the students who took the AP Computer Science test were female

Create Change

  • The only way to make a change is to BE the change. Don’t be afraid to sign up for classes in STEM areas, even if they are primarily made up of boys!

  • Try joining some clubs at school that involve these STEM areas, such as math team, robotics, science bowl, etc. Find other girls who share your interests, and encourage them to participate with you. If you can’t seem to find a club that’s the right fit, try making your own!

  • Contact the administration at your school and see if they will assist you in encouraging girls to get involved in STEM.

  • Contact any local organizations supporting girls/women in STEM and see how you can work with them to make a change.



The Potter books in general are a prolonged argument for tolerance, a prolonged plea for an end to bigotry, and I think it’s one of the reasons that some people don’t like the books, but I think that it’s a very healthy message to pass on to younger people that you should question authority and you should not assume that the establishment or the press tells you all of the truth.

J. K. Rowling (via a-thousand-words)

This would be a lot more powerful if there had been some characters other than white cis straight able bodied teens in the main cast.

Happy National Condom Week!

myplannedparenthood:

http://bit.ly/1gW0eiv

Rape Culture is so ingrained in society that even the laws that define rape promote it.

Leigh for the Day of the Girl blog